Manchester Brewery Expo 2017 (Manchester Beer Week)

So the last Manchester Brewery Expo was in 2015 and you can read my thoughts on it over these 3 parts.

Brewery Expo 2015 – Part 1

Brewery Expo 2015 – Part 2

Brewery Expo 2015 – Part 3

2015 was held over 2 days and whereas technically so was this year’s event, only the Saturday saw all the breweries open.

Also changed was that a Tote bag was not the prize on offer but a t-shirt, plus the fact that 2017 was the nice relaxed event that 2015 became (and actually ended up being) because this year was not controlled by a raging egomaniac.

Rather than regale you with what its like to drink in 11 different breweries this piece is just going to be about the differences between 2015 and 2017.

Irk Valley Breweries

Green Quarter, Red Bank, call this place what you like its the one where the arches the breweries are housed in are service by Victoria Station.

Blackjack Beers

The easiest place to start is that in the storied past of a whole 2 years ago there was only 1 brewery tap open and that was Blackjack.  They are still going strong, strong even; after the evolution of good, non-portable toilets at their tap they have also launched a token system which improves the experience two-fold; less queuing to get a beer and those staff who volunteer to work the bar don’t have to suffer that bloody temperamental cash till.  I think Six O’Clock Beer Co. still cuckoos here too.

It is also worth noting that Blackjack also took control of the Smithfield Hotel in central Manchester and Jack in the Box in Altrincham prior to that.  Bush outside brewery still progressing nicely.

 

Runaway Brewery

Runaway are about to launch a weekly tap themselves, this to complement the new mezzanine they’ve installed at the brewery which is a nice extension, even if it does mean queuing on stairs for beer.

Beatnikz Republic

The first of the new breweries in Manchester city centre (well on this list) and also with a regular Friday/Saturday brewery tap.  Nice toilet signs.

 

Marble Brewery

They don’t have a tap and they weren’t open this year as part of the expo but they don’t need to be.  They themselves have expanded since 2015, with a new outlet called 57 Thomas Street in the quickly becoming irrelevant Northern Quarter as well as an expansion into canning their beers and launching a whole host of new brews, which someone once suggested made Marble the premier lager producers of Manchester.

Piccadilly Breweries

This stretches from Piccadilly Station to Ardwick (seldom visited by trains, better shrubbery than Blackjack) and if you survive crossing the Mancunian Way, you’ll probably cop it from the nut jobs that speed down either side, despite the chalked pleas of the locals.

Track Brewing Co.

Semi-regular brew tap which is always very popular.  Everyone loves Sonoma.

Alphabet Brewing Co

Weekly brew tap, this brewery seemed to steal a march with regards canning their beers.  The regular occurrence of the tap also forced them to install extra toilets and the loudest but best hand drier.

Dan’s Brewery

A complete lack of social media presence doesn’t detract from the newest brewery on the block, with a pedigree shared between the aforementioned Marble and the heavily worshipped Huddersfield outfit that is Magic Rock.

Carbon Smith Brewing

Just starting in 2015, not open in 2017 but still around in some capacity, which may also see yet another brewery appear in central Manchester too.

Beer Nouveau

Replacing Privateer, this brewery lead the charge of a regular weekly brew tap, also expanded into the other half of the arch and is launching their own Heritage Beers Barrel funding thing, which in itself has exceed expectation has also expanded its funding limit.  Origami cuckoos from here too.

Chorlton Brewing Co.

Expanded capacity, now canning generally exclusively and still not confirmed if they are going with Tesco or not…well that is what everyone wanted to know.

Manchester Brewing Co

Another addition since 2015, with semi regular brew taps.  Has a ping-pong table.

Squawk Brewing Co.

Only opened again for the first time since 2015 (that is what I’m telling myself anyway), they work closely, almost symbiotically with Track to host brew taps throughout the year.  Did not serve Tagine on this day and toilet not as spectacular as it once was but these are minor quibbles.  Is looking to get a new fermenter.

Add to this that those breweries that did start out as one man outfits have now also expanded their staffing and it is showing to me at least, a human who did think that there were too many breweries and that some were bound to fold quickly, has not come to pass.

Yet.

In the centre of Manchester.

Breweries are dropping in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester but that is another story.

 

A Look Back In Anger. And Every Other Fucking Direction

The Terrorists will not change us…

Except when it comes to delaying our election process, delaying democracy.

Except when it comes to the state wanting even greater powers to actually hack into its citizens private communications.

Except when it comes to freedom of speech because apparently 80,000 people want The Sun banned in Manchester because they are brain-dead twats living in an irony-free zone.

Except I don’t full know how to express myself in words, so here are some emojis.

Except I want people to lose their jobs if they make a joke or say something possibly defamatory.

Except now I’ve got a tattoo – solidarity brothers and sisters.

Except when it comes to being able to actual discuss just what the fuck is going on in the world.

Standard Response

Following the events at the Manchester Arena on the 22nd of Many 2017 there followed the usual, typically predictable response to a terrorist attack.

The #PrayFor and #NotAll hashtags fly like winged monkeys, the avatars changed to accommodate the latest geographical victim, well one that is in the West at least, you’d never have a static avatar if you had to commemorate everyone blown to bits in the Middle East.

The UK press wait a day or so and then dwell upon the attacker(s) because for some reason it feels that the public need to know their name(s), their background, their history because that doesn’t detract from the victims at all.

We also have to preach the mantra that terrorists don’t represent Islam but merely a warped view of it and it has nothing to do with religion.

That last point is bollocks, always has been, always will be…

Give it a week and then the police will release a report about an increase in “hate crime” – quite what being blown up, run over, shot or stabbed is if it isn’t hate is beside the point in this most Orwellian-like crime, but if you’ve been called a nasty name that too is a crime apparently on a par with loss of life and needs as much media focus.*

Above all it is pushed by all and sundry that we should “carry on” and that was should not let “hate beat love.”

Hate

Hate is OK.  Hate is a valid human emotion.

This past fortnight has all been about love, or people’s versions of what love is, not even Foreigner knew what it was and needed it showing to them but either way its was all about love.

One big, homogeneous, nondescript, identity-less Love.

The avatar changes, the bee tattoos, the candle-lit vigils do nothing but focus on the individual and their suffering, which is nothing, it is absolutely fuck-all to those that were actually killed, their next of kin and those who actually could have been victims.

What, so you didn’t “love Manchester” before you changed your avatar and you will stop loving it when you change it?

Your bee tattoo and graffiti, possibly a nice symbol of solidarity is really just look-at-me narcissism, less about love and more a constant reminder of carnage.

You only have love? You have no hate, because hate is all terrorists have and you are better than terrorists?

Not killing people makes you better than a terrorist, not having any other emotions makes you an unthinking drone.

And this is the problem.  I don’t hate you for changing your avatar or getting a tattoo or painting a picture, or singing a song or lighting a candle.   Grief, if that honestly what it is as opposed to relief, is something personal that we all deal with in our own way.

What I do hate, apart from delusional, murdering fucksticks is the rest of the response; that we carry on as normal and yet we still modify our behaviour, our language, our ability to ask questions or offer up answers and even opinions.

In the Kübler-Ross model there are five stages to dealing with grief: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance.

There seems to be a collective brain-fart at work that we avoided the 2nd stage and just focus on the 3rd and 5th.  The world of social media seems to turn into Rimmer after he has had his first meeting with the Polymorph in Red Dwarf.

You neither have to bargain with terrorists, because you can’t and you certainly don’t have to accept it, regardless of what Mayors of London say.

I have love and it doesn’t need mood slime to help flourish, but I certainly have hate too.  The hate won’t keep me any more safe that those apparently without it but it is my response to events, along with continuing to question and to use the same language.

Hate is OK.  Hate is a valid human emotion. It is all about how you channel it.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

 

*Hyperbole but it does seems as much gravitas is placed on “hate crime” statistics than any other crime.  Crime is hate, all crime is a hate crime.

Burnage to The Heatons – A Crawl of MicroBar Bottle Shops

Burnage (Pronounced: Bur-ni-d-g; or Bur-n-arrr-ge if you want to sound posh) always registered in my young mind as one of those places you don’t want to get caught out being in after dark.  Not quite as ominous of Longsight, Broughton or the infamous Moss Side but still just an “avoid” place.

All titles are links.

So you get the train out of Piccadilly for 2 stops, about 10 minutes, get off at Burnage Station and walk 1 minute to…

Reasons To Be Cheerful (@R2BCBeerCafe)

 

Of course I never had any reason to go to Burnage until the news was announced that this place was opening (it opened in January 2017) and I needed to do a recce to gauge roughly where it would be located and what this crawl would be like.

There is cider, 6 keg fonts and 3 casks (cellared) and most importantly…coat hooks on the bar…

 

Lovely little venue with a guy serving the beer, at the time of calling, called Dave who was very friendly and talkative.

The only odd thing about the place is its frontage is kind of subdued next to the ramp way of the take-away next door.

 

You then walk back passed the train station and continue over Kingsways in a straight line for about a quarter of an hour, passed the sign the lets you know you’re entering Stockport, you can tell this too because they’ve still got Co-Op stores, and you’ll end up at…

The Beer Shop

Which was closed on this occasion…but I had been before…

 

Beer Shop opened in 2011, and the place acts more like an off-license with a great range of beer bottle AND that happens to have a couple of casks (jacket chillers) that an actual micro boozery.  With its TV usually showing sports and its location in the middle of a housing estate it also feels more like someone’s front room, so overall it is a bit of a unique experience in the realms of drinking in Greater Manchester.

It is a bit of a windy 15 minute walk (that’s wind as in the movement that isn’t of the bowels) to Shaw Road which it the venue of the next place, which is…

Bottle Stockport

 

Opened in 2015, recently extended opening hours make this place more likely to be open when visiting these days, it is all keg and bottles and the seating and tables are those high, posing ones but its a nice little place with a good and varied range of beers.

 

Beers Manchester wrote a more detailed blog about Bottle here.

Then all you have to do is get up and take a left on to Heaton Moor Road which merges into School Lane when it crosses the A6 and you have reached…

Heaton Hops

There isn’t much more to be said about this place seeing as since its opening in 2015 it won award after award and the only time I’ve been able to get a seat is if I get there just as the shutters open.

2 cask, 8 keg, loads of bottles, a downstairs I’ve still never visited and the 70% chance you’ll get ranted at (and can join in with) by Jimmy from Malay Street Food  which is always good fun, though not as much fun as his food.

Once again, Beers Manchester writes more on this place, here.

After you’ve sampled the delights of Heaton Hops you can then walk back on yourself to Heaton Chapel train station and take the train back the Manchester (passé) or go via Stockport way and onward to where the drinking delights of Cheshire await.

Of course, other beer outlets are available

 

Thanks for reading.

Beer & Food Pairings – Careful Now

Twitter polls are fun – it seems Sunday’s are the time for beer related ones and other that the regular #hopinions that Beer O’Clock show pods loving fires out on God’s day there was one and a subsequent blog piece by the former Ale Bastard now more journalistically savvily named Yes Ale

The poll was about whether beer and food pairings were possibly going to become common place in, what I suspect was certain places.  I was adament it wouldn’t be the case, in fact I’d go as far to say it probably won’t ever be but it was actually his blog that reminded me that after a random day drinking around Manchester centre, myself and a group of acquaintences had ended up at the Red’s BBQ place and I had noted that most of thier meals came with beer suggestions, all of which were ultimately ignored, by everyone at the table.

I like food, I like it a lot.

I like beer, I like it a lot.

The two together – nope.

This is merely a personal and actual physical thing where on my palate both things are ruined rather than complemented and it isn’t a case of not finding the right pairings because for some odd reason, probably to do with the occasion and general vibe, constant eating at a beer festival is easy, a sit-down meal with a side of beers, far from it.

The closest I thought a good pairing would be considered menu worthy was a sorachi ace beer (I forget which one, it isn’t important) with a meat dish with sriracha chili sauce and that is about as well to do as it gets.  Give me pub snacks with my pint, or stodgey festival fodder and you’re laughing but that is me chosing what I want to eat with the beer I’ve chosen, what I don’t want is for the beer to be chosen for me.

I noted  when last at the Alphabet/Grub Brewery Tap that happens most Saturdays in Manchester that they suggest food to go with the beers.  Convieniently each beer goes with a food from each food stall and of course they are only suggestions, there is no compulsion but sometimes nothing beats a pint of bitter with those odd packets of Ploughmans.

The wineification of beer won’t happen but I fully expect quite a few people to make quite a bit of money out of people before most realise they’ve been conned into a taste of a lifestyle that their pay day loans won’t support.

One finally thought, with so many beers desperately trying to be more like food and be as far away from beer as possible, why bother pairing it, just keep on guzzling down murk bombs stuffed with lactose and fruit juices and save money by buying a few packets of Cheese Moments.

 

Thanks for reading.

Day 6 – #12BeersofXmas

Day 6 – #12BeersofXmas 2016

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Brewery – Beer Nouveau

Location – Greater Manchester, Lancashire via Peterborough, Cambridgeshire (historically Northamptonshire).

The Drink: Big DIPA

ABV: 10.9% – 330ml

Style: Double IPA – Barley Wine Hybrid

Additional info:

Galena & Challenger hops; Maris Otter, Lager, Wheat and Crystal malts. 35 IBU, suitable for vegans.

Pouring a lovely deep orangey-red with a quickly dissipating clear white head.  The aroma is smokey, boozy, hoppy and burnt sugars.

Light on the tongue with very little aftertaste, this is a very, very dangerous high ABV beer whose taste gives you no warnings whatsoever.  The taste is light citrus, smoke and hoppy.

I personally can’t get passed the colour though, it just looks fantastic.

I think all of this beer was bottled but what you do need to do is get down to their brewey tap.  Unit 75 on North Western Street/Temperance Street, you’ll be greeted by a fine range of cask and keg beers plus generally a beer served from the wood.  Wines and ciders are also available and Meads too.  Plus snacks the fire to keep you warm, that is if you don’t work up enough of a sweat playing the Wii games.

Merry Christmas to all and thank you to Steve.

This post was brought to you by Weezer – a band I like but don’t actually have any of their albums in any format.

Thanks for reading.

Independent Salford Beer Festival 2016 – A Review

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A review of the 2016 Independent Salford Beer Festival (ISBF2016, ISBF16) – which is the third and apparently the final one.

If you need some background reading (or just to increase my blog views), see the past two year’s reviewed below:

Review of 2014 (1st Festival)

Review of 2015 (2nd Festival)

Normally I’d start with a nice shot of the glassware – but I’ve not washed up them up yet, plus I think it would fit in better with the wrap-up post I aim to do about this gathering as a whole, so the above will have to do for now.

A small review by @StereoSurrealis can be found here

THE review, by THE man himself and with nicer pictures can be found here (uber craftists be damned).

It was at a meet the brewer with Weird Beard (at Heaton Hops) that I became aware of the organisers intentions for 2016’s beer festival, at a point where it wasn’t the final one it was going to be the first not only with brewers outside of the better Northern part of England but with Keg beers too (Evil Keg Filth as its known).

Skip forward many months later and Jim Beam Barrel Aged Double Perle makes its first appearance in Manchester.

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In fact if the point hadn’t been hammered home enough, ALL the beers at this festival were either debuting or were specially brewed for the festival and were not going to be available anywhere else.

Four or five of your pounds sterling got you into the sessions which ran from Thursday 20th October to Saturday 22nd October at St Sebastian’s Community Centre, Salford (Pendleton), 10 minutes walk from the church.

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All beers were no more than £6 a pint and we are talking festival prices and 10% beers, something even my dad eventually came around too.

Food available was turkey (optional stuffing) barms (baps, teacakes, etc.), vegetarian chilli (with good spice level), lamb hot pot (with beetroot, always beetroot).

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Or if you are my dad…

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A 50/50 split of chilli and hot pot (lobby, stew, scouse, etc.) with the addition of (and many thanks to the staff for searching for it) English mustard.

Talking of my dad’s taste buds Chilli Relish were there again with their home-grown, home-made sauces and chutneys. Plenty of tears were observed as some fool-hardys tried the 2 million Scoville sauce.  Not my dad though, he had one bead of sweat, complained that the front part of his tongue was numb and then appeared to have some 60’s LSD flashback for about a quarter of an hour.

tenor

 

People came from far and wide…

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…even a bird of prey.

There was music too “curated” by Duke and the Darlings

Non-alcoholic drinks were provided by @SteepSodaCo which after a heavy session on Thursday were very much welcomed to kick-start the big weekend.

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The beers though were what most were here for, well that and an amazing time

I’m adding the beers here for posterity and because there were far too many to single out as many were excellent.

CASK
Abbeydale, Sheffield – Japanese Citrus Pale – Yuzu Pale DH Sorachi & Lemongrass – 4.5%
AllGates, Wigan – Blackstar – Marshmallow Porter – 4.8%
Atom Beers, Hull – Critical Temperature (Habanero Edition) – Rye Pale Ale Coffee Porter – 6.5%
Bad Seed, Malton – Session I.P.A. – Session I.P.A. – 4.0%
Beer Nouveau, Manchester – E.S.B. – Best Bitter – 5.5%
Black Jack, Manchester – Ahtenum Lager – Lager – 5.0%
Brass Castle, Malton – Rubicon – Red Rye Ale – 4.8%
Brewsmith, Ramsbottom – Session I.P.A. – Session I.P.A. – 4.8%
Bridestone’s, Hebden Bridge – Off Yer Fruit! – Fruit Aged Session I.P.A. – 4.4%
Carbon Smith, Manchester – Salted Caramel Milk Stout – Salted Caramel Milk Stout – 5.1%
Cheshire Brewhouse, Congleton – Caribbean Crossroads – Rum Cask Aged B.I.P.A. – 6.5%
Cloudwater, Manchester – I.P.A. Nelson Sauvin – I.P.A. – 6.5%
Cwrw Ial, Llanarmon yn I̢l РZawn РAmerican Lemon Wheat Р4.2%
Emmanuales, Sheffield – The Deer Pants for Porter – Smoked Porter – 5.0%
Five-Oh, Prestwich – T.B.C. – T.B.C. – T.B.C.%
Five Towns, Wakefield – Secret Life of Arabica – Imperial Stout – 8.0%
Five Towns, Wakefield – Beauty and the Beast – Citrus D.I.P.A. – 9.0%
Howard Town, Glossop – Ten – Belgian-Style Quad – 10.0%
Lost Industry, Sheffield – Peanut Butter Milk Stout – Milk Stout – 4.4%
Mallinsons, Huddersfield – Hop Shaker – Nelson Pale Ale – 3.8%
Marble Brewery, Manchester – U.S. Extra Porter – Citra Dry Hop Porter – 5.9%
Neptune, Maghull – Black Percula – Chocolate Orange Stout – 4.5%
North Riding, Scarborough – Dandelion & Burdock Porter – Porter – 4.5%
Offbeat, Crewe – C Smackdown – Hoppy Pale Ale – 4.0%
Pictish, Rochdale – Pekko – Pekko (Single Hop) Pale – 4.2%
Quantum, Stockport – Pale Extra Ale – Strong Pale Ale – 6.0%
Rammy Craft, Ramsbottom – Whinberry Mild – Mild – 6.1%
Rat Brewery, Huddersfield – Grapes of Rate – Barrel Aged Barley Wine – 10.0%
Revolutions, Castleford – Psycho Candy – Belgian Centennial I.P.A. – 7.0%
Rivington, Rivington – The Make – New Zealand D.I.P.A. – 8.3%
Serious, Rochdale – Ginger Saison – Saison – 6.9%
Squawk, Manchester – Oat Pale – Dry-Seven-Hopped Pale – 4.9%
Thirst Class Ale, Stockport – Kiss My Ace – Sorachi Pale Ale – 4.0%
Tickety Brew, Stockport – Kiwi Saison – Saison – 4.3%
Torrside, New Mills – American Barley Wine – Barley Wine – 10.0%
Track, Manchester – Troika – UA / AUS / NZ Pale – 5.2%
KEG COLLABORATIONS
Bad Seed, Malton vs. Track, Manchester – Pacific Juice Monster – Pale Ale – 5.0%
Bexar County, Peterborough vs. Offbeat, Crewe – Thin Line Between Genius & Insanity – Kombucha Soured Milk Neopolitan Ale – 3.2%
Black Jack, Manchester vs. Brass Castle, Malton – Lemon Spritz – Hazy Lemon Ale – 5.0%
Five Towns, Wakefield vs. Squawk, Manchester – Mango and Sumac El Dorado – Farmhouse I.P.A. – 5.8%
Mallinsons, Huddersfield vs. Runaway, Manchester – Redcurrant Saison – Saison – 6.5%
North Riding, Scarborough vs. Thirst Class, Stockport – War of the Raspberries – Imperial Raspberry Oatmeal Stout – 6.7%
EVIL KEG FILTH
Atom Beers, Hull – Phobos & Demos – Rye Pale Ale – 7.0%
Bexar County, Peterborough – Cold Pressed Ale – Coffee Infused Pale Ale – 5.1%
Elusive Brewing, Finchampstead – Love Action – Cranberry & Vanilla Stout – 5.8%
Mourne Mountains, Warrenpoint – Mourne Mist – Pilsner – 4.5%
Northern Alchemy, Newcastle Upon Tyne – Moroccan Spiced Mild – Mild – 3.4%
Otherton Ales, Crewe – Passepartout (Brett Aged) – Bretted D.I.P.A. – 7.4%
Weird Beard, London – Double Perle (Jim Beam) – Barrel Aged Imperial Milk Stout – 8.2%

After the punters voted the winner of Beer of the Festival was @ElusiveBrew with their excellent Love Action – yes, its not Five Towns this time, yes its a Southern brewery that won and yes its a keg beer that did indeed win.

Full marks (no pun) to @RunawayBrewery and @Mallinsons for providing a keg and cask version of their collaboration and for doing a talk.

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Turns out in the talk everyone preferred the keg but the voting public preferred the cask (as did I, which I’d been saying to anyone who’d listen since the Thursday when I compared both).

There was a talk by Connor (“fresh” from fatherhood and a disappointing season by Bradford Bulls) about Manchester Beer Week, though less about the plans for 2017 and more about how people found 2016; with brewers, bloggers and drinkers all having a say.  Who need communicators?  All points were made honestly and clearer and were taken and given with respect.  Two side of the same coin really, you can’t please everyone but you can give it a damn good try.

Some more people found out who I am and of course the regulars entertained themselves.  Many offers were made to take up the reigns so it happens again in 2017 but that is something for other to decide and the personal aspect of the past 3 years of this festival I will talk about next.

Basically if you weren’t there you missed out but don’t be fearful of that, at least not from a beer perspective because as great as the brews were it is the people who drive it.

So to all staff, builders, brewers, volunteers and attendees, you all know who you are, well done.

 

Thanks for reading.

Brewing For A Beauty & A Beast

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This is the second Five Towns collaboration for the 2016 Independent Salford Beer Festival, the first one (The Secret Life Of Arabica) can be found here

I was supposed to help with that one, having suffered through being clean sober and getting to bed early on Friday 19th February I was woken, not by my alarm, set for 4am, but by a phone-call from Jim at 5am wondering where I was.  Having enjoyed my time at Five Towns for Art Decade – the 1st collaboration for the 2015 festival it pained me to miss out but the time had passed and it just wasn’t meant to be.  I drowned my sorrows on the Saturday night having cursed my alarm clock the whole day, then I went to bed.

My alarm clock went off at 4am Sunday morning.

Said alarm clock now makes up land-fill somewhere.

 

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Luckily a second collaboration was planned and I wasn’t going to miss it this time.  Memories of Leigh (Centurions, rugby league) losing to Bradford as we drove home after the Art Decade brew day were minimised by it being such a great day.  2016, with Leigh already promoted to Super League a couple of week prior meant that this brew day saw September out in style.

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Standard brewery hose porn.

Mash On…

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Not porridge, you don’t eat porridge on brew days in Wakefield you eat:

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Bacon, sausage and egg barms from across the road, followed by a chippy dinner from next door.

 

Sparge…

1baiue

 

 

The bittering hops were Centennial, the aroma from further hop addition of Centennial and Kazbek (Mohawk style).

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Given that this man spent a good 5 minutes inhaling ever hop addition with a satisfied glaze over his eyes…which was not due to the early start, long day (and night in his case) and 12 cups of coffee…it is amazing any timings were kept, like Gollum and the ring.

 

wp_20160924_016Adjuncts to this beer in the boil were Kaffir Lime Leaves, dried orange peel and soured orange peel.  An addition of dried lemon peel will be added at the fermenting stage, along with copious amounts of fresh oranges, lemons and limes.

 

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From porridge to curry.

 

Yeast is US05 if you are interested and after all that it should give us an IPA of about 8.5-9%

2016 is the year of many deaths of popular musicians, namely David Bowie and the name of the beer “Beauty & the Beast,” is the title of the opening track off his 1977 album “Heroes.”

There is some suggestion that this could be black & tanned with the aforementioned Secret Life…and given that that beer is named after the closing song on the same album it would be a fitting tribute and also to the final Independent Salford Beer Festival.

A review of the inaugural (2014) event

A review of the 2015 event