Burnage to The Heatons – A Crawl of MicroBar Bottle Shops

Burnage (Pronounced: Bur-ni-d-g; or Bur-n-arrr-ge if you want to sound posh) always registered in my young mind as one of those places you don’t want to get caught out being in after dark.  Not quite as ominous of Longsight, Broughton or the infamous Moss Side but still just an “avoid” place.

All titles are links.

So you get the train out of Piccadilly for 2 stops, about 10 minutes, get off at Burnage Station and walk 1 minute to…

Reasons To Be Cheerful (@R2BCBeerCafe)

 

Of course I never had any reason to go to Burnage until the news was announced that this place was opening (it opened in January 2017) and I needed to do a recce to gauge roughly where it would be located and what this crawl would be like.

There is cider, 6 keg fonts and 3 casks (cellared) and most importantly…coat hooks on the bar…

 

Lovely little venue with a guy serving the beer, at the time of calling, called Dave who was very friendly and talkative.

The only odd thing about the place is its frontage is kind of subdued next to the ramp way of the take-away next door.

 

You then walk back passed the train station and continue over Kingsways in a straight line for about a quarter of an hour, passed the sign the lets you know you’re entering Stockport, you can tell this too because they’ve still got Co-Op stores, and you’ll end up at…

The Beer Shop

Which was closed on this occasion…but I had been before…

 

Beer Shop opened in 2011, and the place acts more like an off-license with a great range of beer bottle AND that happens to have a couple of casks (jacket chillers) that an actual micro boozery.  With its TV usually showing sports and its location in the middle of a housing estate it also feels more like someone’s front room, so overall it is a bit of a unique experience in the realms of drinking in Greater Manchester.

It is a bit of a windy 15 minute walk (that’s wind as in the movement that isn’t of the bowels) to Shaw Road which it the venue of the next place, which is…

Bottle Stockport

 

Opened in 2015, recently extended opening hours make this place more likely to be open when visiting these days, it is all keg and bottles and the seating and tables are those high, posing ones but its a nice little place with a good and varied range of beers.

 

Beers Manchester wrote a more detailed blog about Bottle here.

Then all you have to do is get up and take a left on to Heaton Moor Road which merges into School Lane when it crosses the A6 and you have reached…

Heaton Hops

There isn’t much more to be said about this place seeing as since its opening in 2015 it won award after award and the only time I’ve been able to get a seat is if I get there just as the shutters open.

2 cask, 8 keg, loads of bottles, a downstairs I’ve still never visited and the 70% chance you’ll get ranted at (and can join in with) by Jimmy from Malay Street Food  which is always good fun, though not as much fun as his food.

Once again, Beers Manchester writes more on this place, here.

After you’ve sampled the delights of Heaton Hops you can then walk back on yourself to Heaton Chapel train station and take the train back the Manchester (passé) or go via Stockport way and onward to where the drinking delights of Cheshire await.

Of course, other beer outlets are available

 

Thanks for reading.

Beer & Food Pairings – Careful Now

Twitter polls are fun – it seems Sunday’s are the time for beer related ones and other that the regular #hopinions that Beer O’Clock show pods loving fires out on God’s day there was one and a subsequent blog piece by the former Ale Bastard now more journalistically savvily named Yes Ale

The poll was about whether beer and food pairings were possibly going to become common place in, what I suspect was certain places.  I was adament it wouldn’t be the case, in fact I’d go as far to say it probably won’t ever be but it was actually his blog that reminded me that after a random day drinking around Manchester centre, myself and a group of acquaintences had ended up at the Red’s BBQ place and I had noted that most of thier meals came with beer suggestions, all of which were ultimately ignored, by everyone at the table.

I like food, I like it a lot.

I like beer, I like it a lot.

The two together – nope.

This is merely a personal and actual physical thing where on my palate both things are ruined rather than complemented and it isn’t a case of not finding the right pairings because for some odd reason, probably to do with the occasion and general vibe, constant eating at a beer festival is easy, a sit-down meal with a side of beers, far from it.

The closest I thought a good pairing would be considered menu worthy was a sorachi ace beer (I forget which one, it isn’t important) with a meat dish with sriracha chili sauce and that is about as well to do as it gets.  Give me pub snacks with my pint, or stodgey festival fodder and you’re laughing but that is me chosing what I want to eat with the beer I’ve chosen, what I don’t want is for the beer to be chosen for me.

I noted  when last at the Alphabet/Grub Brewery Tap that happens most Saturdays in Manchester that they suggest food to go with the beers.  Convieniently each beer goes with a food from each food stall and of course they are only suggestions, there is no compulsion but sometimes nothing beats a pint of bitter with those odd packets of Ploughmans.

The wineification of beer won’t happen but I fully expect quite a few people to make quite a bit of money out of people before most realise they’ve been conned into a taste of a lifestyle that their pay day loans won’t support.

One finally thought, with so many beers desperately trying to be more like food and be as far away from beer as possible, why bother pairing it, just keep on guzzling down murk bombs stuffed with lactose and fruit juices and save money by buying a few packets of Cheese Moments.

 

Thanks for reading.

Day 6 – #12BeersofXmas

Day 6 – #12BeersofXmas 2016

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Brewery – Beer Nouveau

Location – Greater Manchester, Lancashire via Peterborough, Cambridgeshire (historically Northamptonshire).

The Drink: Big DIPA

ABV: 10.9% – 330ml

Style: Double IPA – Barley Wine Hybrid

Additional info:

Galena & Challenger hops; Maris Otter, Lager, Wheat and Crystal malts. 35 IBU, suitable for vegans.

Pouring a lovely deep orangey-red with a quickly dissipating clear white head.  The aroma is smokey, boozy, hoppy and burnt sugars.

Light on the tongue with very little aftertaste, this is a very, very dangerous high ABV beer whose taste gives you no warnings whatsoever.  The taste is light citrus, smoke and hoppy.

I personally can’t get passed the colour though, it just looks fantastic.

I think all of this beer was bottled but what you do need to do is get down to their brewey tap.  Unit 75 on North Western Street/Temperance Street, you’ll be greeted by a fine range of cask and keg beers plus generally a beer served from the wood.  Wines and ciders are also available and Meads too.  Plus snacks the fire to keep you warm, that is if you don’t work up enough of a sweat playing the Wii games.

Merry Christmas to all and thank you to Steve.

This post was brought to you by Weezer – a band I like but don’t actually have any of their albums in any format.

Thanks for reading.

Independent Salford Beer Festival 2016 – A Review

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A review of the 2016 Independent Salford Beer Festival (ISBF2016, ISBF16) – which is the third and apparently the final one.

If you need some background reading (or just to increase my blog views), see the past two year’s reviewed below:

Review of 2014 (1st Festival)

Review of 2015 (2nd Festival)

Normally I’d start with a nice shot of the glassware – but I’ve not washed up them up yet, plus I think it would fit in better with the wrap-up post I aim to do about this gathering as a whole, so the above will have to do for now.

A small review by @StereoSurrealis can be found here

THE review, by THE man himself and with nicer pictures can be found here (uber craftists be damned).

It was at a meet the brewer with Weird Beard (at Heaton Hops) that I became aware of the organisers intentions for 2016’s beer festival, at a point where it wasn’t the final one it was going to be the first not only with brewers outside of the better Northern part of England but with Keg beers too (Evil Keg Filth as its known).

Skip forward many months later and Jim Beam Barrel Aged Double Perle makes its first appearance in Manchester.

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In fact if the point hadn’t been hammered home enough, ALL the beers at this festival were either debuting or were specially brewed for the festival and were not going to be available anywhere else.

Four or five of your pounds sterling got you into the sessions which ran from Thursday 20th October to Saturday 22nd October at St Sebastian’s Community Centre, Salford (Pendleton), 10 minutes walk from the church.

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All beers were no more than £6 a pint and we are talking festival prices and 10% beers, something even my dad eventually came around too.

Food available was turkey (optional stuffing) barms (baps, teacakes, etc.), vegetarian chilli (with good spice level), lamb hot pot (with beetroot, always beetroot).

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Or if you are my dad…

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A 50/50 split of chilli and hot pot (lobby, stew, scouse, etc.) with the addition of (and many thanks to the staff for searching for it) English mustard.

Talking of my dad’s taste buds Chilli Relish were there again with their home-grown, home-made sauces and chutneys. Plenty of tears were observed as some fool-hardys tried the 2 million Scoville sauce.  Not my dad though, he had one bead of sweat, complained that the front part of his tongue was numb and then appeared to have some 60’s LSD flashback for about a quarter of an hour.

tenor

 

People came from far and wide…

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…even a bird of prey.

There was music too “curated” by Duke and the Darlings

Non-alcoholic drinks were provided by @SteepSodaCo which after a heavy session on Thursday were very much welcomed to kick-start the big weekend.

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The beers though were what most were here for, well that and an amazing time

I’m adding the beers here for posterity and because there were far too many to single out as many were excellent.

CASK
Abbeydale, Sheffield – Japanese Citrus Pale – Yuzu Pale DH Sorachi & Lemongrass – 4.5%
AllGates, Wigan – Blackstar – Marshmallow Porter – 4.8%
Atom Beers, Hull – Critical Temperature (Habanero Edition) – Rye Pale Ale Coffee Porter – 6.5%
Bad Seed, Malton – Session I.P.A. – Session I.P.A. – 4.0%
Beer Nouveau, Manchester – E.S.B. – Best Bitter – 5.5%
Black Jack, Manchester – Ahtenum Lager – Lager – 5.0%
Brass Castle, Malton – Rubicon – Red Rye Ale – 4.8%
Brewsmith, Ramsbottom – Session I.P.A. – Session I.P.A. – 4.8%
Bridestone’s, Hebden Bridge – Off Yer Fruit! – Fruit Aged Session I.P.A. – 4.4%
Carbon Smith, Manchester – Salted Caramel Milk Stout – Salted Caramel Milk Stout – 5.1%
Cheshire Brewhouse, Congleton – Caribbean Crossroads – Rum Cask Aged B.I.P.A. – 6.5%
Cloudwater, Manchester – I.P.A. Nelson Sauvin – I.P.A. – 6.5%
Cwrw Ial, Llanarmon yn I̢l РZawn РAmerican Lemon Wheat Р4.2%
Emmanuales, Sheffield – The Deer Pants for Porter – Smoked Porter – 5.0%
Five-Oh, Prestwich – T.B.C. – T.B.C. – T.B.C.%
Five Towns, Wakefield – Secret Life of Arabica – Imperial Stout – 8.0%
Five Towns, Wakefield – Beauty and the Beast – Citrus D.I.P.A. – 9.0%
Howard Town, Glossop – Ten – Belgian-Style Quad – 10.0%
Lost Industry, Sheffield – Peanut Butter Milk Stout – Milk Stout – 4.4%
Mallinsons, Huddersfield – Hop Shaker – Nelson Pale Ale – 3.8%
Marble Brewery, Manchester – U.S. Extra Porter – Citra Dry Hop Porter – 5.9%
Neptune, Maghull – Black Percula – Chocolate Orange Stout – 4.5%
North Riding, Scarborough – Dandelion & Burdock Porter – Porter – 4.5%
Offbeat, Crewe – C Smackdown – Hoppy Pale Ale – 4.0%
Pictish, Rochdale – Pekko – Pekko (Single Hop) Pale – 4.2%
Quantum, Stockport – Pale Extra Ale – Strong Pale Ale – 6.0%
Rammy Craft, Ramsbottom – Whinberry Mild – Mild – 6.1%
Rat Brewery, Huddersfield – Grapes of Rate – Barrel Aged Barley Wine – 10.0%
Revolutions, Castleford – Psycho Candy – Belgian Centennial I.P.A. – 7.0%
Rivington, Rivington – The Make – New Zealand D.I.P.A. – 8.3%
Serious, Rochdale – Ginger Saison – Saison – 6.9%
Squawk, Manchester – Oat Pale – Dry-Seven-Hopped Pale – 4.9%
Thirst Class Ale, Stockport – Kiss My Ace – Sorachi Pale Ale – 4.0%
Tickety Brew, Stockport – Kiwi Saison – Saison – 4.3%
Torrside, New Mills – American Barley Wine – Barley Wine – 10.0%
Track, Manchester – Troika – UA / AUS / NZ Pale – 5.2%
KEG COLLABORATIONS
Bad Seed, Malton vs. Track, Manchester – Pacific Juice Monster – Pale Ale – 5.0%
Bexar County, Peterborough vs. Offbeat, Crewe – Thin Line Between Genius & Insanity – Kombucha Soured Milk Neopolitan Ale – 3.2%
Black Jack, Manchester vs. Brass Castle, Malton – Lemon Spritz – Hazy Lemon Ale – 5.0%
Five Towns, Wakefield vs. Squawk, Manchester – Mango and Sumac El Dorado – Farmhouse I.P.A. – 5.8%
Mallinsons, Huddersfield vs. Runaway, Manchester – Redcurrant Saison – Saison – 6.5%
North Riding, Scarborough vs. Thirst Class, Stockport – War of the Raspberries – Imperial Raspberry Oatmeal Stout – 6.7%
EVIL KEG FILTH
Atom Beers, Hull – Phobos & Demos – Rye Pale Ale – 7.0%
Bexar County, Peterborough – Cold Pressed Ale – Coffee Infused Pale Ale – 5.1%
Elusive Brewing, Finchampstead – Love Action – Cranberry & Vanilla Stout – 5.8%
Mourne Mountains, Warrenpoint – Mourne Mist – Pilsner – 4.5%
Northern Alchemy, Newcastle Upon Tyne – Moroccan Spiced Mild – Mild – 3.4%
Otherton Ales, Crewe – Passepartout (Brett Aged) – Bretted D.I.P.A. – 7.4%
Weird Beard, London – Double Perle (Jim Beam) – Barrel Aged Imperial Milk Stout – 8.2%

After the punters voted the winner of Beer of the Festival was @ElusiveBrew with their excellent Love Action – yes, its not Five Towns this time, yes its a Southern brewery that won and yes its a keg beer that did indeed win.

Full marks (no pun) to @RunawayBrewery and @Mallinsons for providing a keg and cask version of their collaboration and for doing a talk.

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Turns out in the talk everyone preferred the keg but the voting public preferred the cask (as did I, which I’d been saying to anyone who’d listen since the Thursday when I compared both).

There was a talk by Connor (“fresh” from fatherhood and a disappointing season by Bradford Bulls) about Manchester Beer Week, though less about the plans for 2017 and more about how people found 2016; with brewers, bloggers and drinkers all having a say.  Who need communicators?  All points were made honestly and clearer and were taken and given with respect.  Two side of the same coin really, you can’t please everyone but you can give it a damn good try.

Some more people found out who I am and of course the regulars entertained themselves.  Many offers were made to take up the reigns so it happens again in 2017 but that is something for other to decide and the personal aspect of the past 3 years of this festival I will talk about next.

Basically if you weren’t there you missed out but don’t be fearful of that, at least not from a beer perspective because as great as the brews were it is the people who drive it.

So to all staff, builders, brewers, volunteers and attendees, you all know who you are, well done.

 

Thanks for reading.

Brewing For A Beauty & A Beast

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This is the second Five Towns collaboration for the 2016 Independent Salford Beer Festival, the first one (The Secret Life Of Arabica) can be found here

I was supposed to help with that one, having suffered through being clean sober and getting to bed early on Friday 19th February I was woken, not by my alarm, set for 4am, but by a phone-call from Jim at 5am wondering where I was.  Having enjoyed my time at Five Towns for Art Decade – the 1st collaboration for the 2015 festival it pained me to miss out but the time had passed and it just wasn’t meant to be.  I drowned my sorrows on the Saturday night having cursed my alarm clock the whole day, then I went to bed.

My alarm clock went off at 4am Sunday morning.

Said alarm clock now makes up land-fill somewhere.

 

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Luckily a second collaboration was planned and I wasn’t going to miss it this time.  Memories of Leigh (Centurions, rugby league) losing to Bradford as we drove home after the Art Decade brew day were minimised by it being such a great day.  2016, with Leigh already promoted to Super League a couple of week prior meant that this brew day saw September out in style.

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Standard brewery hose porn.

Mash On…

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Not porridge, you don’t eat porridge on brew days in Wakefield you eat:

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Bacon, sausage and egg barms from across the road, followed by a chippy dinner from next door.

 

Sparge…

1baiue

 

 

The bittering hops were Centennial, the aroma from further hop addition of Centennial and Kazbek (Mohawk style).

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Given that this man spent a good 5 minutes inhaling ever hop addition with a satisfied glaze over his eyes…which was not due to the early start, long day (and night in his case) and 12 cups of coffee…it is amazing any timings were kept, like Gollum and the ring.

 

wp_20160924_016Adjuncts to this beer in the boil were Kaffir Lime Leaves, dried orange peel and soured orange peel.  An addition of dried lemon peel will be added at the fermenting stage, along with copious amounts of fresh oranges, lemons and limes.

 

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From porridge to curry.

 

Yeast is US05 if you are interested and after all that it should give us an IPA of about 8.5-9%

2016 is the year of many deaths of popular musicians, namely David Bowie and the name of the beer “Beauty & the Beast,” is the title of the opening track off his 1977 album “Heroes.”

There is some suggestion that this could be black & tanned with the aforementioned Secret Life…and given that that beer is named after the closing song on the same album it would be a fitting tribute and also to the final Independent Salford Beer Festival.

A review of the inaugural (2014) event

A review of the 2015 event

 

Is The Labour Party Finished in Manchester?

I was going to put “The North” but I’m sticking with my local area for rather obvious reasons.

I’m not exactly a massive fan of the system we call democracy in the UK as it currently stands, I’m more a fan of proportional representation (PR) than first passed the post (FPP) but then again as has been shown with the recent referendum on the UK’s continued membership of the European Union, because the vote didn’t go the way of the “enlightened” then it clear indicates that some people shouldn’t even be allowed to vote, let alone the if PR was the system of voting in the UK, then UKIP would indeed have far more parliamentary representation than either the Lib Dems or the Greens.

A great many in the county of Manchester voted to Leave, 7 of the 10 boroughs in fact.  Because the referendum was reduced by some to Leave = right-wing, Remain = left-wing it came as quite a shock that supposedly a left-wing party, Labour heartlands would vote in massive numbers to Leave.  So much so that this somehow fell on the head of Jeremy Corbyn (to be fair the man has been against the EU most of his political career) and so now the Labour Party is tearing itself apart with a leadership election.

As the fallout between Corbyn and ABCs (anybody but Corbyn) continues in the Labour party, it is the face of Tony Blair that always looms large and this 3 consecutive victories (achieved regardless of numerous invasion follies) that are brought up as to why Corbyn isn’t a suitable leader and/or Prime Minister.

Watching spin doctor Alistair Campbell (ever so briefly) on Question Time banging on about how they won over Tory voters highlights what went wrong and what continues to go wrong.  Yes, you need to win over some of these voters but sadly they did it at the expense of their core working class vote.

Its a bit like the mob in the Christopher Nolan Batman film “The Dark Knight,” they had a problem with not having a grip on power any more (Note: any MP using the term “in power” should be viewed with suspicion) so turn to a force they did not fully understand, this brought some initial quick gains but they undercut themselves in the long-term.

Of course that analogy can be applied today, Jeremy Corbyn is no great cure-all but at least he isn’t a Liberal Democrat, a party akin to John Daggett, teaming up with the Tory’s Bane and then looking on in horror as to what destruction they have enabled while they themselves also end up destroyed.

Damn, if only I had a political analogy involving Ra’s al Ghul.

Locally the Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA), all Labour except 1, a Conservative of the Trafford Borough (which voted 57.7% to Remain).

My borough council, Wigan, voted 63.9% to Leave the EU, it is made up of 65 Labour seats, the other 10 split between local independents and the Conservatives.

Manchester City Council has 95 Labour party representatives and 1 Lib Dem (60.4% Remain).

I’ve blogged about local issues before locally in Atherton and around the borough as Wigan Labour systematically remove popular and necessary public assets for private profiteering.

About the loss of Manchester’s heritage as Manchester City Labour purge history from Manchester’s streets and most recently the evisceration of another historic part of Manchester so Gary Neville can build his own versions of Barad-dûr and Orthanc.

Of course should Labour lose seats not just in Greater Manchester but in its heartlands around the UK, then all the blame by those same MPs will be lain at the feet of Corbyn and the cyclical mess will continue, people will just get more disillusioned with politics and MPs will continue to feather the nests and prime themselves for big paying consultancy jobs when they are eventually gotten rid of, all this while conveniently forgetting about how Labour has been wiped out in Scotland by exactly the same behaviour.

On a national scale, the worst thing about all of this is that you have a new level of patronisation, especially when every Tory and anti-Corbyn entity try to sound magnanimous by uttering “we need a strong opposition to us/the current government in check and better,” and as every TV channel and news services continues to do special programmes about the end of Labour.  These programmes are solely from a political/media point of view and have absolutely nothing to do with actual support within the general public, highlighting the growing gap and level of contempt that both the media and the current crop of politicians have for us plebs.

Many in the media use the term Populism in a negative way, safe way to explain an apparent rise in “right-wing” (Trump, UKIP, Leave winning the EU referendum, etc).  As you can see from the link description the term populism can be ascribed to any side of the political divide and this is the problem, and if you’ve sat at home blaming “stupid people” and “racists” for everything that has gone on in the UK recently than you are just as culpable as those who blame “immigrants” and “Europe” – it is a political malaise but hopefully the tide is turning to something more positive and hopeful.

Thanks for reading.

Petition against Neville’s Vanity Towers

P.S.

As I always feel a blog should have one picture and to show that I’m not actually right-wing myself, I post my latest results from Political Compass

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#BrewExit

The final part of my “Shitting on my Doorstep” trilogy.  Unless I do a Douglas Adams.

In fact I’m annoyed that I made the “They Live” comparison in Part 1 and then didn’t carry it on as I think “Escape from New York” would work well with Part 2 and then obviously “The Thing” for this piece, or vice versa, oh John Carpenter how I failed thee.

Also worth reading on a similar note (scarily so) to the first part but more coherently scribed is a piece by Boak & Bailey and this, by an actual local brewer (Beer Nouveau).

If you want to know just how many brewers there are in the county of Greater Manchester then this is the list I’m trying to maintain.

I’ve not made an update for a while, it is quite possibly some will be removed soon, either they never got started or they have been swallowed up by the competition locally and gone off to do something else.  Though I do note another one is starting up, coupled to a restaurant, I could be cynical about its reasons but it would be unfair to undercut a new business before it has even started.

One of the things I’ve noticed since starting the list and drinking more in central Manchester (the city centre to be precise) is the hold that only a specific amount of breweries have over a specific amount of bars and pubs.

I’m not talking about the family breweries (Holts, JW Lees, Robinsons & Hydes) with their own pubs and ties.  Nor am I talking about those newer breweries smart enough to expand their portfolios into pubs and bars.

No, it now seems that other venues in Manchester; those that regularly make “must visit” lists and that I freely admit will recommend if someone wants to know where to go, are themselves tied.  Some even appear to have dedicated lines.

In fact I could walk into any number of these bars and pubs and predict, baring the actual beer, which local breweries will be on offer from week to week.  Even more concerning is these bars will also feature the same reoccurring cast of breweries from further afield.

Good breweries making good beers are always going to have reserved space at any bar, but to me it seems that some places have lost any sense of adventure in getting in new, especially local, breweries.

The chances of me finding beers from the 50+ breweries not located in the centre of Manchester actually in city centre venues are virtually nil and there are only a select few from in Manchester itself that get a look in as it is anyway.

It is all a bit too cliquey and, though we are dealing with business, seems far removed from the grass-roots, against ties, against repetition mantra that you would associated with the real ale/craft beer movement.  Its almost as if there is a central Manchester cartel.

There are a plethora of breweries within the city centre of Manchester.  Being cynical this time I would happily suggest that a few of them are here because the rent is cheaper than London and the competition is less established, less well funded and therefore more easily crushed.  It wouldn’t really surprise me if breweries from London and elsewhere actually came and pitched up in central Manchester to give themselves an even firmer footing in the North.

These ‘bigger micros’ with their advertising and marketing budgets can court every starry-eyed beer journalist to give them cheap publicity and gushing praise which then easily feeds into the cyclical dog-whistle nature of people who drink only ‘craft’ because its on trend.

Conversely, these city centre breweries don’t seem to make it out into the sticks at all.  Granted small towns and cities can conceivably have a small and less “crafty” (errghh, sorry) drinking population, also these drinkers will have less money to spend, but from what I have observed this is rather myopic and slightly patronising.

Whereas keg beers would never really get a look in, there is a vast market for cask within the metropolitan county of Manchester that is relatively untapped by local breweries, and I’m not just talking about the city centre ones.

Of course you have your beer cities; London, Sheffield, Leeds, Liverpool, Newcastle with Edinburgh and Glasgow and possibly Nottingham up & coming and these are the big markets, it is always the priority to get a foothold in them.

Obviously these cities themselves have their own local breweries, especially our capital and so the competition is even more fierce.  Granted, it isn’t like you can just walk into a pub say which brewery you’re from and hand over a price sheet and wait for a call.

Actually, fuck that, it is that simple.  And people are always willing to pay a little extra from something a little different and especially something that is new.  Simple logistics to the people in pubs near me is that a return trip into Manchester will set you back about £5, so that fiver “saved” can be spent on slightly more expensive drinks.

I don’t expect businesses to have show any real loyalty to where they are brewing.  But there is a massively cynical exploitation (granted, of the easily exploitable) going on in Manchester.  It makes me wonder, given how many London breweries have sold up recently, if some of those in Manchester aren’t angling for a big pay-day sometime soon too.

 

Thanks for reading.