(Morrissey x Killdren) – Common Sense + Outrage =

A list of the reasons why bands/the music of certain acts was banned in the USSR.  Of course they aren’t the only (former or current) nation to have such a draconian approach to what art is deemed offensive.

 

Certain Christian groups in the USA thought that AC/DC stood for Away from Christ the Devils Calls (a fine backronym).

When I went to Donnington in 1995 the local vicar wanted to perform a ritual at the ground, so sure was he that Satan himself would appear when the band White Zombie performed.

I’m remembering; though it was before my time, the legendary TV moment the Sex Pistols were interviewed by Bill Grundy (a fine soak of a Lancastrian) and the reporting fury in the next days newspapers about the offence taking at the profanity used before the watershed (9pm UK time), or even at a time of family viewing.

The Sex Pistols launched themselves into mainstream consciousness but I always wonder, please feel free to comment below, just how much impact the wearing of the Nazi version of the Swastika was in offending people because in this day and age, swearing at any time of day is a bit passé but far-right tropes are very hip.

I’m also remembering the Iron Maiden single Sanctuary and this front cover…

This Wikipedia article documents the controversy about this and of “Maggie’s revenge” on a the cover art of a subsequent Iron Maiden single.

Being a fan of the rock and heavy metal genres, offence is something you never can take with any band or artwork or article of clothing within the umbrella because it is a given that it will happen and that is probably why you like the band (other than the music).

The original cover of Guns N’ Roses “Appetite for Destruction” LP.

The Vestal Masturbation t-shirt by Cradle of Filth.

Every song ever recorded by Cannibal Corpse.

But that was before 2016 and life has been very different since then.

The modern life of an outrage story is brief but its echoes can stretch for a while and then even come back in on themselves.

I’ve never got Morrissey, or The Smith for that matter.  I appreciate them in the way I appreciate say David Bowie or Elton John, they are highly talented, clearly successful and even I like a handful of their songs but none of their works are in my record collection.

The same goes for Killdren, who I doubt anyone has heard of and in a short while I doubt anyone will, not because they are bad, or good, music is of course subjective but that they will be able to ride their little wave of notoriety for a few weeks before inevitably fading.

Morrissey; as far as this author is concerned’ is a prissy twat who I have, at least from a stance of liking people who can troll a varied amount of self-identifying groups, gained a marked amount of respect for as I’ve got older.

He continually rankles meat eaters (of which I am one) in a way that the standard whiny veggie or vegan can only dream of but his latest annoyance, as of only the start of last week (say 27th May 2019) was to perform on a US talk show wearing a pin badge for the “far-right” For Britain Party, for which his support seems to be based on his avid animal rights stances.

Queue the outrage train, literally, as Morrissey’s posters for his latest album (hmm, being provocative tied in with the launch of new material, what strange and new behaviour is this?) were taken down from MerseyRail train stations within Liverpool following, one complaint.  Whether the complainant was a full on born and bred member of the self-pity city or just had the misfortune to live/work there we will never know.

Fast forward to today (3rd June 2019) and the latest bit of politically-motivated musical outrage comes courtesy of a “punk” band called Killdren who were set to be performing at the annual designer wellie-booted twat parade that is the Glastonbury music festival.

I once went to Glastonbury; the only vague memory I have of it, the best aspect that is, is that once you were in the grounds you were in.  You could walk from your tent with whatever alcohol you’d brought in with you and you wouldn’t have to leave it outside another designated area if you wanted to go in to see the performances.  Yet they still had bars and people were still buying from them, a revelation.

A acquaintance’s band was also playing there that year, in some pointless small tent at about 2 in the morning.  This is the slot that Killdren were allotted where they could perform their classic work “Kill Tory Scum” and possibly depict the murder and mutilation of conservative members and voters as a way of highlighting how years of austerity have killed thousands of innocent people.

Apparently.

It is all fair comment.  Regardless of you political stance it is a simple, trite and none nuanced way of getting your opinions across and if you can get extra publicity from the offended and its associated one-day tidal wave of shit then everyone is happy.

And you can sell a lot more t-shirts.  Yeah, punk ethos, down with corporate whores.

That in the space of a week the political left and the political right have both been offended by appropriations of opposing politics in artistic form helps me feel comfortable that I am, personally at least, wonderfully surfing in the middle on an free expression tidal bore.

And so, until the next shit tides starts as a ripple I’ll leave you with some Cannibal Corpse.

 

Hmm, not sure why all the water references came in, probably to do with all the salty tears of offence that have been shed and will never stop flowing.

 

Thanks for reading.

Slayer – The End of Gigs

So the 9th of November 2018 marked the final time I expect to see Slayer live.

I’ve seen Slayer a good deal of times, though the last time they toured (2015) they played the Manchester Apollo and a baulked at paying £50+ to see them, despite the venue being me favourite place for live music.

Give it exactly 3 years and stick them in the larger venue and them retiring (hmm, I’m not convinced) and the £50+ is something I’ll happily part with.

The last time I saw Slayer live was at Sonisphere in 2014.  It also remains the last music festival I attended.  Seeing Slayer without Jeff Hanneman, who died in 2013, caused tears for me and my brother, not something you’d associated with Slayer but emotion got the better of us.  The departure of drummer Dave Lombardo more or less sealed me not wishing to see them again for, as much as I respect Gary Holt and Paul Bostaph, without the original guitarist and drummer you are only getting 50% Slayer.

Plus, thanks to neck surgery, it is still very not seeing frontman Tom Araya head-banging like a madman.

Having watched a 7-song set by Anthrax and left feeling a bit empty that they weren’t the main support and that their set wasn’t longer I went to look at the merchandise.  Cue myself and my mates sounding like old-time curmudgeons as we berated not only the stuff for sale but also the price.

Some years ago I saw, at the Manchester Apollo, “Priest Fest” – Judas Priest supported by Megadeth and Testament.

It was an excellent concert but for all the fine songs and performances on display the one thing that stuck in my head was the 60-minute countdown timer I could see during Megadeth’s set.

Flick back to 2018 Slayer and they just blasted out songs, as usual, little crowd interaction, no encore just straight played through for nearly 90 minutes and then pissed off stage.

It was again an excellent show but it just seemed a bit deflating.  Too structured, too professional.

That is gigs in general these days, money really is the bottom line these days now the market has fallen out of record sales and it shows in a lot of the more recent gigs I’ve been too.

Plus £5.20 for Fosters…fuck off.

I doubt they’ll be a year from now on that I don’t even watch live music but either I am officially getting old or it really is just too polished these days.

Maybe I should stick to pub cover bands.

 

Thanks for reading.